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Flipping Your Classroom – Creating Interactive Video Quizes and Tutorials. EDpuzzle vs Educaplay – Which tool to use?

Whether you are thinking of flipping your class, creating an e-learning course or just supporting your students when they are not in the classroom, the use of video holds a great potential to bring in real and relevant content to your students. Even more so now, when you can turn videos into a real asynchronous conversation with a student, drawing their attention to the most important information and asking content check questions every now and again to make sure students have managed to grasp the message of a segment clearly before moving on to the next segment. There are plenty of free tools that can help you to do just that. They all have a short learning curve and do not require you to make a great time commitment to develop a video tutorial.

In this post I will compare two tools that I have had a chance to explore this month.

I will start with EDpuzzle since this is where my love for video tutorials was born. Previously, I posted a movie review activity developed in EDpuzzle ( Film Review Vocabulary Workshop and Lesson Plan post ). The activity was designed to help students to absorb the topic-related vocabulary. You can check it out by clicking on the image below:

Film Review - Vocabulary Workshop and Lesson Plan

Here are two other examples of what you can do with EDpuzzle if you are using video tutorials to explain a certain grammar structure. Once again, click on the images below to open the video quizes.

to like vs to be like the difference video tutorial

relative clauses video tutorial

As you can see, EDpuzzle offers you some versatility:

– You can use videos from a vide range of sources: YouTube, KhanAcademy, TED, National Geographic, Numberphile and so on.

– You can cut the video.

– You can record your voice comments over the video.

– You can add text comments that will pop up on the screen and pause the payback.

– You can embed multiple choice and open-ended questions and you can set them to pop up in any part of the video.

making video puzzles and tutorials fot tefl

Creating a question or a comment is really easy and fast. You just need to click on the question mark on the line above the video and drag the question pointer to the part of the video where you want your question to pop up.

edpuzzle vs educaplay flipping your clasroom which tool to use

 

Then click on the question pointer.

how to create video-based quizes

The major drawback here, however, is that if you opt for the open-ended question, you will have to check the answers manually and if your students are not regitered on EDpuzzles, you will never know their answers, morever, they themselves will never know the correct answer and will be allowed to continue watching the video.

Another rather disapointing fact about EDpuzzle is that it doesn’t allow you to provide custom feedback. Multiple-choice questions have pretty bland correct/incorrect feedback option. Open-ended questions have no feedback at all and, as I have mentioned above, it doesn’t even allow you to type in the correct answer. Yes, very dissapointing here.

But on the bright side, you can create classes, assign videos and track students’ anwers if your students are registered with EDpuzzle (and so far the registration is free).

Once your EDpuzzle is ready, you can share it with your students, you can embed it on Moddle or on your webpage.

As your students watch the video, they will see where the question is nested in the video timeline. You can block skipping so that students will not be able to skip any segment of the video.

Once the question in answered, the students can choose to rewatch a part of the video or to go on to the next segment. EDpuzzle will allow the students to continue watching the video even if the given answer is incorrect.

On the whole, EDpuzzle is a good tool for short videos and simple multiple-choice CCQs. But this is not the tool I can personally use.

Now let’s talk about Educaplay, which is one of my top favorite tools, it allows you to create a wide range of educational quizes and puzzles, including video-based quizes.

It is also very easy to use, you just need to create a free account and you are ready to go. To create a quiz just click on the “Create Activity” in the main menu and choose the “video quiz” option in the type of the activity.

educaplay vs edpuzzle which tool to choose for your flipped classroom

Educaplay allows you to create multiple choice questions with one (Single) or several correct answers (Multiple), you can also create open-ended questions (Written and Wide written).

Flipping Your Classroom - Creating Interactive Video Quizes and Tutorials. EDpuzzle vs Educaplay - Which tool to use?

Flipping Your Classroom - Creating Interactive Video Quizes and Tutorials. EDpuzzle vs Educaplay - Which tool to use?

Contrary to EDpuzzle, you can add feedback for each type of questions. The drawback here is that the same feedback will be given once a student answers a question, regardless of whether the question is answered correctly or not. So in the feedback you should explain the correct answer rather than writing something like “well done!”

educaplay video quizes multiple choice questions

With open-ended questions you can add several possible answers.

Like on EDpuzzle, you can lock the playback and forbid your students to skip parts of the video.

You can also create groups, and track each student’s activities, here is an example of a report you can get for each student:

educaplay vs edpuzzle which tool to choose for your blended learning or online course

Of course, like with everything else, there is room for improvement. Like, for example, an option that would send the learner back to re-watch a certain segment  if the question is answered incorrectly (At this point, if you answer incorrectly, you lose points and the question is marked in red but you can still proceed to the next segment. )

Upon the completion of the activity, the students can review correct answers once again.

Educaplay see corrections

Here are some of the video quizes I have made in Educaplay to give you an idea on what this tool has to offer.

 

Comparative and superlative degrees of adjectives educaplay video puzzle

Active vs Passive Voice Video Tutorial

Active vs Passive Voice

 

used to video tutorial and interactive video quiz

“Used to” for past habits

 

too much many enough and very interactive video tutorial

Too much/many, enough and very

Expressing purpose, cause and result interactive video tutorial

Expressing purpose, cause and result

And to wrap it all up, here is a comparison chart of EDpuzzle and Educaplay.

  EDpuzzle Educaplay
? Multiple choice questions with one or several correct answers and open-ended questions.  Multiple choice questions with one or many correct answers, open-ended, long open-ended questions.
Feedback No custom feedback. Multiple choice questions: standard correct/incorrect feedback.

Open-ended questions do not allow you to set the correct answer that students need to type in. If the students are registered on EDpuzzle, you can check their answers to open-ended question manually.

Custom feedback for each question, however, the feedback is given on the question, not on the answer.The students will also recieve the standard correct/incorrect feedback.

Open-ended questions allow you to set the correct answer or answers and Educaplay automatically checks the students’ open-ended answers against the correct ones.

Tracking If your students are registered on EDpuzzle, you can create classes, assign videos and track your students’ answers. You can create groups and track each student’s progress if your students have a free account on Educaplay.
Looping Even if the answer to the question is incorrect, the student will be able to proceed to the next question. The student will be able to proceed to the next question even if the answer given to the previous question is incorrect.
Locking skipping Yes Yes
Privacy All video puzzles that you create are public. To make them private you need to negotiate with the developers. The video quizzes that you create are public unless you have a premium account.
Sharing and embedding Yes Yes
Download Flash scorm activities No Yes

No stars, no evaluation points because everyone chooses what suits their needs best. I fell in love with EDpuzzle but I switched to Educaplay and I find that it suits me better.

Please, share what tools you personally use. I want to learn from you.

Happy Weekend! 🙂

Relative Pronouns with comics and jokes: who, which, that, when and where

We use relative clauses to provide more information about a person, a thing or a place.

We use WHO to give more information about people.

Relative pronouns in comix and jokes - who

We use WHICH when we want to provide more information about a thing.

Relative clauses with comics and jokes - which

We can use THAT instead of WHO  or WHICH.

Relative clauses with comics and jokes - THAT

Relative clauses with comics and jokes - THAT

We use WHERE for places.

Relative clauses with comics and jokes - THAT

And WHEN for time.

Relative clauses with comics and jokes - THAT

NB! When we add more information about something by using a relative clause, we use the article THE, not a/an

Also notice that we put the relative pronouns immediaty after the noun about which we are giving more information.

If you want to see all this gathered together and more, then check the  grammar s-show below that I created for my B1 students. I used comic strips and jokes to explain and to illustrate  the use of relative clauses and relative pronouns. As always, at the end of the slideshow there is an exercise to practice the skills and to check understanding.

You can also hear me going through the slideshow in a video that was made for the university I am currently teaching at.

To Like and To Be Like

“What does she like?” and “What is she like?”

These two questions can be very confusing for learners. This slideshow will  bring some clarity to the use of “To Like” and “To Be Like”.

The slideshow also includes an exercise to practice the skills and to check the understanding.

You can also hear me going through the slideshow in the video that was made for the university where I am currently teaching:

USED TO for past habits and routines

I made this slideshow to explain the use of USED TO to my B1 students, it seemed to help them quite a bit.

The slideshow also includes a gap-fill exercise to practise the skills.

You can also hear me going through the slideshow in the video that was made for the university where I am currently teaching:

Using too much/too many, (not) enough and very

Being able to express the reason, cause and result of actions is essential in any language. In English we use too, (not) enough, very, too many and too much for this purpose and they can be pretty confusing for learners. The following slideshow clearly explains the difference between them and includes a gap-filling exercise to practice the use of each in real context.

You can also hear me going through the slideshow in the video that was made for the university where I am currently teaching:

Conditional sentences, type 0, 1 and 3 – Grammar game

CONDITIONAL BATTLE FIELD
Aim To practise the use of conditional sentences type 0, 1 and 2
Interaction Groups of 3, 4 or 5 students
Exercise type: Filling in the gaps, correcting mistakes
Language: B1
Time: 15 – 25 minutes
Materials: A marker and a whiteboard, a set of question cards for the class.
Procedure:
  1. Project on a whiteboard a slide with a 4*5 grid in which each cell is numbered in order from 1 to 20. Alternatively, you can draw a 4*5 grid on a board and number each of its cells.

Conditionals Grammar Game

  1. Cut up the questions handout so that each card features one question.
  2. Divide the class into teams of three or four. Each team needs to select an easy-to-draw symbol (a circle, a star a triangle, a smiley face) or a letter to represent them.
  3. Tell the students that the 20-square board is a piece of land that they  are  trying to conquer. In order to conquer each piece of land the students need to correctly answer a question on the card.
  4. The teams decide the order in which they will play the game (for this purpose, the students can roll dice, play rock-paper-scissors game, or draw pieces of paper with numbers corresponding to the number of teams).
  5. Each of the teams draws a question card from the pile, collaboratively, the teams decide on an answer. Allow a certain amount of time then, ask each of the teams to read their question card aloud to the class and to suggest an answer.
  6. If the question is answered correctly, the team can draw their symbol in the square corresponding to the number of the question.
  7. If the answer if incorrect, the teacher collects the question card without giving the correct answer and puts the card at the bottom of the pile, later this card has to be drawn again by one of the teams.
  8. The game is over when all question cards have been answered.
  9. The team that manages to put their symbol in the greatest number of squares, wins.

The game is available from download from Slideshare and here >>>  CONDITIONAL BATTLE FIELD

Conditional Sentences Type 0, type 1 and type 2 + exercises

The slideshow covers the cases of use and the structure of Conditional sentences type 0, type 1 and type 2, it also explains the differences between each type and includes a gap-fill exercise to practice all three types of conditional sentences.

And here is another comics-style exercise to practice the use of conditional sentences type 2 (unreal present, regrets about the present).

And here is a matching exercise to practice the use of conditional sentences type 0, 1 and 2.  You need to  match the phrases on the left with the phrases on the right to make sentences. You also need to put the verbs in brackets into the correct form to make conditional sentences type 0, 1 or 2. 

You can cut it up for bodily-kinesthetic learners so that they can move the parts of the sentences and line them up on the table to make conditionals.

The hand out is available for download from slideshare and from here >>

 

Wacky stories – Comminucative ESL Game to practise vocabulary and tenses.

Wacky Stories
Aim: To practice vocabulary, all 12 tenses and conditional sentences (adjustable). To practice storytelling techniques (building suspense, flash-backs, flash-forwards, etc.)
Interaction: Groups of three or four
Exercise type: Speaking, storytelling
Time: 15 minutes
Language: Depends on the level of Students
Level: A2 – C2
Materials: 1 set, cut up per group (the set can include as many cards as you decide and may vary depending on the level of the students).
Procedure: In this activity the students make a chain story, using the words and images on the cards, as well as the tenses or grammar structures indicated on them. With a little imagination and sense of humor from your students this game can get hilarious. If you want to emphasize the use of tenses and grammar structures, there is an extra tense component on each card, this component instructs the students not only to use a noun, a verb or an adjective on the card but to construct the sentence in a certain tense. This can bring into the story flash-backs and flash-forwards (so you may need to pre-teach these storytelling techniques first).

  1. At the beginning of the game each of the students has 6 cards. The rest of the cards are placed on a desk in a pile face down.
  2. The students have a couple of seconds to look at their cards. To determine the order in which the students will play the game, they will draw from a bag that contains pieces of paper with numbers on them (see the chart below), the student who draws number 1 from the bag, goes first. Alternatively, they can play a hand game of rock-paper-scissors or roll a dice or toss a coin.
  3. The fist student starts telling an imaginary story using the vocabulary on the cards that s/he has and also putting the sentences in the tense indicated on these cards. Every time the student uses a word or an image on the card, s/he places the card face up in front of her/him and on a piece of paper writes down the points earned for playing each card. If the student manages to use the word on the card, the student earns one point, for using the indicated grammar structure, the student gets additional 2 points. Each student can play as many cards as they can in each turn, but they cannot be speaking for more than 2 minutes in one turn.
  4. The student who goes next has to continue the story that the first student started but use the words that s/he has on her/his cards.
  5. The third student continues the story.
  6. When the students are out of cards, then at the next turn each of them can pick up three cards from the pile. If they cannot continue the story, they miss their turn. If a student picks up three cards, but can play only one or two, the student gets to keep the unused cards and can play them at the next turn.  
  7. The game ends when there are no more cards left in a pile or when the time set for the activity is over.
  8. Each of the students counts the points on the cards they have played   during the game. The student with the top score wins.

The printable handout can be downloaded here >> Wacky Stories – Comminucative ESL Game
The game is also available for download on slideshare:

Phrasal verbs with TAKE and GIVE + exercise

The slideshow covers 6 phrasal verbs with TAKE and GIVE and includes exercises to practice them.

The presentation covers the following phrasal verbs:

take over

take up

take back

give back

give in

give up

The phrasal verbs are introduced with the help of comics and the built-in exercises will get the students thinking and applying these phrasal verbs in real context.

Screenshot_5 Screenshot_6 Screenshot_7 Screenshot_8 Screenshot_9

 

Too, (not) enough, many, very, too much/many + exercises

In this slideshow I used comic strips to explain the use of too/(not) enough/very/ too many and too much.
The slideshow also includes an exercise to practice their use.

 

[YouTube=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BRVX5gtZIpE]

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