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Relative Clauses – Games and Activities

In a previous post I covered the use of relative pronouns and the difference between each of them (Relative Pronouns with comics and jokes)

Here are some activities  for you (or your students) to play around and to hone the skills.

If you (or your students) need a quick review, start with watching a video tutorial and answering the embedded questions.

Interactive EdPuzzle Video Tutorial Relative Clauses

Click on the image to open the interactive EdPuzzle tutorial

Aim: To practice the use of relative clauses (who, which, that, when and where)
Interaction: Individually or in groups
Exercise type: Filling in the gaps
Language: B1
Time: 10-15 minutes
Materials: Slideshow, 5 pieces of paper for each student, markers
Procedure:
  1. Give each student 5 pieces of paper.
  2. Instruct the students to write down a different relative pronoun (that, who, which, when or where) on each of the 5 pieces of paper that they have.  Recommend the students to use colorful markers and write in big letters that are visible from a distance.
  3. You will be showing your students slides with sentences on them. Each sentence is missing a relative pronoun.
  4. Display the slide with the first sentence on it. Allow some time for your students to read the sentence and to come up with a missing relative pronoun. The students need to raise the paper with a suitable relative pronoun up in the air as soon as possible.
  5. In some cases two variants are possible. If this is the case, the students need to raise two pieces of paper.
  6. The first three students to raise correct papers get an extra point.
  7. The person with the top score at the end of the game wins!

 

You can also download a PDF Version of the questions slides here: Relative Pronouns Game with instructions

In the next  activity you will see a relative pronoun in the middle of the screen.  You need to select 4 sentences in which this relative pronoun can be used.

Play Relative Clauses Game

relative clauses interactive game

Click on the image to enlarge and read the instructions.

Each time you play the game, you are given a different relative pronoun (when, where, which or who), so you may want to play  several times to practice the use of various relative pronouns.

The next game is a collection of activities. It includes 10 exercises in which you need to join two sentences with a suitable relative pronoun.

Relative clauses interactive practice game

Click to enlarge the image and read the instructions

Play The Collection of Activities

Have fun learning and teaching!

 

Grammar with comics and jokes: Comparative and superlative degrees of adjectives + comic-strip style exercise

In this post we will learn comparative and superlative degrees of adjectives.
And before we start let’s meet Josh. He is very young. He is only three years old.Comparative degrees of adjectives
Josh has a baby sister who is even smaller. Her name is Betty and she is only 11 months old. She is almost 2 years younger than Josh.Comparative degrees of adjectives 3
Betty and Josh have a baby cousin. Her name is Lina and she is only 1 month old. She is the youngest of all.

Comparative degrees of adjectives 4Comparative degrees of adjectives 4 Comparative degrees of adjectives 4Comparative degrees of adjectives 4

When we compare two things we add  ER to the adjective.
When we want to describe something that has the highest degree of a quality among three or more things, we use the superlative degree.Comparative degrees of adjectives 5
Try to do this one. Can you form a comparative and superlative degree of COLD?Comparative degrees of adjectives 6
 Comparative degrees of adjectives 7
 Comparative degrees of adjectives 8
 Comparative degrees of adjectives 9
 Easy, isn’t it?
So what would be the comparative degree of smart?

question
Comparative degrees of adjectives 10                           

Can you form the superlative?
Comparative  and superlative degrees of adjectives  11
 When an adjective is short, we add ER and the EST to it, but do we do the same if an adjective is long? Can we say “comfortabler”? What a mouthful! It is too hard to say. That’s why if an adjective has two or more syllables, don’t use ER and EST.Comparative  and superlative degrees of adjectives  12
We use MORE + adj to compare two things.Comparative  and superlative degrees of adjectives  13
 And THE MOST + adj in the superlative degree.Comparative  and superlative degrees of adjectives  14
Can you form the comparative degree of difficult?Comparative  and superlative degrees of adjectives  15
More difficult! And the superlative degree is “the most difficult”. Easy, isn’t it?Comparative  and superlative degrees of adjectives  16
And how about famous? This word has two syllables: “Fa-mous”. The majority of two syllable words form their comparative and superlative degrees with more and the most. So what is the comparative degree of Famous?

Comparative  and superlative degrees of adjectives  17
More famous! Can you form the superlative as well?Comparative  and superlative degrees of adjectives  18

Of course, it is the most famous!

Comparative  and superlative degrees of adjectives  18
So when we want to compare 2 things, we use the comparative degree of adjectives.When we have 3 or more things and we want to highlight one particular thing in this group which has the highest degree of a certain characteristic, we use the superlative degree.If an adjective is short and has only one syllable, we add ER to the adjective in the comparative form and the EST in the superlative. Some two-syllable adjectives also form comparatives and superlatives with ER and EST. However, if the word is long and has two or more syllables, we add MORE in front of the adjective in the comparative and THE MOST in the superlative degree. We can also use LESS and THE LEAST. They are the opposites of more and the most.
Comparative  and superlative degrees of adjectives  infographic 19
Now some adjectives can be tricky when it comes to spelling.For example, try to form the comparative and the superlative degree of BIG. Since it is a very short one-syllable word we will use ER and the EST.

Comparative  and superlative degrees of adjectives  20
And we will get BIGGER. But notice that the final G is doubled. This always happens when the word ends in a Consonant – vowel – consonant sequence (CVC adjectives). We double the final consonant in order to keep the pronunciation.Comparative  and superlative degrees of adjectives  21
Now can you form the superlative form?
The BIGGEST. We will need to double the G once again.Comparative  and superlative degrees of adjectives  22
Now try this one. Once again it is a short one-syllable word and we need to add ER and the EST, but like in the previous example here we have a consonant followed by a vowel and another consonant. 

Comparative  and superlative degrees of adjectives  24
So we need to double the T and we will get WETTER. And what will be the superlative degree?Comparative  and superlative degrees of adjectives  25
The WETTEST with double T once again.Comparative  and superlative degrees of adjectives  26
CVC adjectives are not the only adjectives with a little bit tricky spelling in comparative and superlative degrees.For example, take a look at EASY. It is also a short adjective that forms its comparative and superlative forms with ER and the EST. Can you notice the pattern?Comparative  and superlative degrees of adjectives  27

What has changed in the comparative degree? The “Y” has changed to “I”. Can you form the superlative degree? How will you spell it?
Comparative  and superlative degrees of adjectives  1128                   

It will be “THE EASIEST” with an “I” instead of the “Y”.
What about friendly? What are its comparative and superlative degrees?It is one of those two-syllable adjectives that form comparative degrees with ER and the EST but be careful with spelling.
Comparative  and superlative degrees of adjectives  29
One-syllable and some two-syllable adjectives ending in “E” add only “-R” or “-ST”.For example, look at “SAFE”. Can you form the superlative degree?Comparative  and superlative degrees of adjectives  30
It will be “THE SAFEST” with only one “E”.Comparative  and superlative degrees of adjectives  31
So, remember that one-syllable and some two-syllable adjectives ending in “E” add only “-R” or the     “-ST” in the comparative and in the superlative.Adjectives ending in “Y” drop “Y” and add “I” before -ER and the -EST.CVC-adjectives double the final consonant.comparative and superlative degrees of adjectives changes in spelling infographic
There are also several adjectives that form their comparative degrees differently. You need to memorize these forms.For example, “GOOD” in its comparative form becomes “BETTER”.irregular comparatives and superlatives 34
 And in the superlative it is “THE BEST”.irregular comparatives and superlatives 35
“BAD” also changes differently in the comparative and in the superlative degree. Do you know its forms?

BAD COMPARATIVE AND SUPERLATIVE

In the comparative form it becomes “WORSE”. irregular comparatives and superlatives 36

And in the superlative it becomes “THE WORST”. “FAR” also has irregular comparative and superlative forms. There are several more adjectives in this group. For now try to remember these three irregular forms and we will learn more as we go. irregular comparatives and superlatives infographic 37 Comparative  and superlative degrees of adjectives  exercise 40 Comparative  and superlative degrees of adjectives exercise 41 Comparative  and superlative degrees of adjectives exercise 42   Comparative  and superlative degrees of adjectives exercise 43 Comparative  and superlative degrees of adjectives exercise 44 Comparative  and superlative degrees of adjectives exercise 4145 Comparative  and superlative degrees of adjectives exercise 45 Comparative  and superlative degrees of adjectives exercise 46 Comparative  and superlative degrees of adjectives exercise 48 Comparative  and superlative degrees of adjectives exercise 49   Comparative  and superlative degrees of adjectives exercise 50 Comparative  and superlative degrees of adjectives exercise 51 Comparative  and superlative degrees of adjectives exercise 52 Comparative  and superlative degrees of adjectives exercise 53 Comparative  and superlative degrees of adjectives exercise 54   way to go

This is also available as a grammar slideshow from Slideshare. Please, like, comment and share if you enjoyed this post, so that I can create more of what you like and find of use. Smiles 🙂

You can also hear me going through the slideshow in a video that was made for the university I am currently teaching at.

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