Category Archives: Teaching ideas

Conditional sentences, type 0, 1 and 3 – Grammar game

CONDITIONAL BATTLE FIELD
Aim To practise the use of conditional sentences type 0, 1 and 2
Interaction Groups of 3, 4 or 5 students
Exercise type: Filling in the gaps, correcting mistakes
Language: B1
Time: 15 – 25 minutes
Materials: A marker and a whiteboard, a set of question cards for the class.
Procedure:
  1. Project on a whiteboard a slide with a 4*5 grid in which each cell is numbered in order from 1 to 20. Alternatively, you can draw a 4*5 grid on a board and number each of its cells.

Conditionals Grammar Game

  1. Cut up the questions handout so that each card features one question.
  2. Divide the class into teams of three or four. Each team needs to select an easy-to-draw symbol (a circle, a star a triangle, a smiley face) or a letter to represent them.
  3. Tell the students that the 20-square board is a piece of land that they  are  trying to conquer. In order to conquer each piece of land the students need to correctly answer a question on the card.
  4. The teams decide the order in which they will play the game (for this purpose, the students can roll dice, play rock-paper-scissors game, or draw pieces of paper with numbers corresponding to the number of teams).
  5. Each of the teams draws a question card from the pile, collaboratively, the teams decide on an answer. Allow a certain amount of time then, ask each of the teams to read their question card aloud to the class and to suggest an answer.
  6. If the question is answered correctly, the team can draw their symbol in the square corresponding to the number of the question.
  7. If the answer if incorrect, the teacher collects the question card without giving the correct answer and puts the card at the bottom of the pile, later this card has to be drawn again by one of the teams.
  8. The game is over when all question cards have been answered.
  9. The team that manages to put their symbol in the greatest number of squares, wins.

The game is available from download from Slideshare and here >>>  CONDITIONAL BATTLE FIELD

Advertisements

Conditional Sentences – Grammar Game

The aim of the game is to practice the use of conditional sentences type 0, 1 , 2, and 3 as well as mixed conditionals.

The game is designed for upper-intermediate students, but you can easily modify the questions.

The game includes three types of questions:

1. Filling in the gaps, where players need to put the verbs in brackets in the correct form (Fill category);

conditionals fill in the gaps game

2. Finding and correcting mistakes. Each sentence in this category has a mistake or two in the use of conditional sentences, the task is to find the mistake(s) and to correct it/them (Fix category);

conditionals correct mistakes game

3. Choosing the most suitable option out of two (Choose category).

conditionals multiple choice game

The game has a main screen with a Jeopardy board, the students select the type of question and its value (more difficult questions value more) and click on a corresponding button.

conditionals grammar game jeorpady

This will take a student to a question slide. When the students give their answer, click on the question mark button in the bottom righ-hand corner, this will take you to an answer screen.

conditionals game
On the answer screen, click on the house icon to return to the main screen with the jeopady board.

conditionals jeopardy game

Have fun learning and teaching!

Click here to download the editable Conditional Sentences Grammar Game > Conditional Sentences Jeopardy 1, 2, 3

Learning vocabulary with songs – Activity + Teacher’s notes

This activity helps to learn at least 20 words and expressions to talk about appearance. The activity is based on the song “Freckles” by Natasha Bedingfield. The slideshow includes teacher’s notes, introduction of the vocabulary and a ready-to-use handout.

Vocabulary: appearance
Level: B1 – B2

Teacher’s Notes

1. Pre-teach the vocabulary on appearance (included in the slideshow).
2. Print out the slides with the lyrics and cut them up along the dotted lines.
3. Give each student a cut-up copy of the lyrics.
4. Play the song once (if you play it on YouTube, make sure the video doesn’t have lyrics displayed).
5. As the students listen to the song for the first time, they arrange the lyrics in order and fill in the gaps with missing words/phrases.
6. Play the song for the second time to allow the students to check their answers and to complete the gaps they have missed during the first listening.
7. As a follow-up activity, you can have a quiz on the words and phrases that the students had to use in order to fill in the gaps.
Screenshot_1

Screenshot_2

Screenshot_3

Screenshot_4

Tools for Teaching Vocabulary – Using text posters in the classroom

When I teach new vocabulary it seems more meaningful to me to introduce it in a though-provoking quote than in a general unspecific sentence that doesn’t strike a vibrant chord in a student. So I usually mine for quotes containing the vocabulary I want to teach and then I use quote generators to quickly create images like you can see in these slides. This is all done automatically and takes you less than 10 second to create a text poster.

%d bloggers like this: